Quentin Stafford-Fraser

An executive summary:

  • I have a blog called Status-Q at www.statusq.org.
  • You can find me as 'quentinsf' on Facebook and Flickr, LinkedIn and Twitter, App.net and Google+.
  • I have a small company called 'Telemarq', which does a mix of strategy consultancy, software development, teaching, writing, and has some products of its own in the pipeline.
  • I'm also a part-time Research Associate at the Cambridge University Computer Lab.
  • Before that I was working at Camvine (Cambridge Visual Networks), a company developing new applications based around networked displays, which I started in 2007. You can read more about Camvine here.
  • I was also director of the Ndiyo project. This attempted to find new, more affordable network computing architectures for the billions of people who will never be able to afford one PC each.
  • Before that I was working on Exbiblio, which I co-founded in 2004.
  • I also co-founded Newnham Research, now DisplayLink, in 2003 and was the CEO for its first couple of years.
  • I have often been credited in the media with inventing the webcam. This is not really justified, though I did have something to do with it. You can find the story here.
  • I've authored and/or been listed as an inventor on dozens of patents. None of these have yet made me any money, but they've done OK for other people!
  • For several years I was a Research Scientist at AT&T Laboratories Cambridge, UK, the lab which was formerly ORL. You can find out about what I did at AT&T here.
  • I did a Ph.D. on Augmented Reality in the Rainbow Group at the University of Cambridge Computer Lab. I was sponsored by (and spent much of my time at) Xerox EuroPARC. More details on my research interests can be found here.
  • I was, I think, the first full-time Computer Officer at a Cambridge college. During this time, I believe I may have created the world's first ten-set Venn diagram.
  • If your browser will let you, you can also hear me say hello. You can find some other personal info here.
  • I think I ran the first web server in Cambridge. I certainly ran the first one in the University, which then became the platform for Computer Science students who wanted to do projects around this new-fangled World Wide Web thing...
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